The PMDG DC-6 for MSFS is in Flight Test... here's a peek

​This morning, Global Flight Operations called the hotel room early. It was very late in Fairbanks, so I excused the faux pas, and grumbled my acceptance of the flight. Robert Everts had decided that the Red Bull folks needed some engine parts delivered, and asked for volunteers. My hand had shot up while I was still thinking about it, don’t really know why…

Anyway, after a steaming shower, I went down to the lobby where the coffee was hot, the Strudel delicious and after gathering the rest of the team we were headed to Vienna Airport in the shuttle. A couple of stops for Security and Customs, and the van deposited us in front of our aeroplane. We had parked at the corner of NE Cargo, out of the way of the 747 and 777 Freighters, and she was buttoned up tight for the night, and a lovely sight as we rounded the corner on the apron.

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We soon were met by some fine folks from Red Bull who had brought out some ground equipment and wanted to see us off. We were glad for their assistance, and truth be told, so was Wien Technik as they hadn’t handled a DC-6 since 1950 something. We soon had Ground Power established, and were fueling for Innsbruck. It would be a shame to have come so far and miss that, wouldn’t it?

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Looking at our flight plan, and after a myriad of discussions with Wien Radar, we had decided to depart on Runway 16 on the SNU 4B (which was usable for non RNAV aircraft- hey, what’s RNAV anyway?). That would get us pointed towards the Sollenau VOR, after which we were assured we could go to LINZ as soon as it was pointing. Again, after much discussion about terrain clearance, we decided on FL130 which was just about the minimums we could get away with. The route was as follows

LOWW Rwy 16 SNU 4B DCT LNZ DCT SBG DCT GSB DCT RTT after which it would be the LOC DME EAST procedure to circle visually for Rwy08 at INN.

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After a lengthy phone conference with Robert (who can be a nervous Nelly with his aeroplanes) I was finally authorized to fly the procedure. The winds were VRB at 3kts, and if at all possible I was going to talk Wien Radar into allowing a Rwy 08 arrival.

The Flight plan required 6000lbs of AvGas which had to be converted to Kilos for the order. Remembering the Gimli Glider, I double checked my maths. We had offloaded the engine equipment in Wien, as Red Bull had their transport equipment standing by on our arrival yesterday, and so we were light today. It was just Armen, Jason Chris and Chris in the back (Henning had by far the most suitcases) and Vin, Henning and I up front. Robert was still admonishing me via text message, about bringing his aeroplane back in one piece, back in Fairbanks.

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With Ground Power and Floods Established we pre-tuned the radios, and tidied up the cockpit before calling Delivery. When in an unfamiliar environment, I like being as prepared as possible so that there is less to trip up on (as there is always something just ahead). The eagle eyed amongst you will see I had also tuned the LINZ ADF. This is important when moving 1950s Transports in modern airspace. There will be times you will need to turn towards a waypoint, however, your needle will not be pointing. The ADF at Linz is a little closer to our flight path than the VOR is…

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One last walk around to make sure everything was buttoned up, a few hugs for our new friends from Red Bull (alas Julian was busy and could not come visit) and we were ready to make some noise. Looking around it was amazing how many rampies and maintenance personnel had somehow found time to wander North to the cargo ramp to watch us start up. There’s just something about a Douglas Transport from the 50’s that touches souls in a much more visceral fashion than the latest offerings from Seattle or Toulouse.

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The start of each flight in the DC-6 is one of my very favorite parts… there is something about awakening 72 fairly large cylinders, their accompanying pistons, connecting rods, cranks, and accessories. Rather than the sterile motoring of an RB-211, this is an exercise in coaxing, cajoling, prodding and hoping. We began with #3. The start sequence is simple- Double check the Cowls are full open. Then select the Fuel Boost Pump for #3 to Low, prime #3 for six seconds, then close the Safety and Start switches. Wait for Henning to count 3 blades, select coil boost on, when Henning gets to six blades flip the #3 Magnetos to both, wait for the engine to fire off around 12 blades, reach down and move the mixture to full auto rich. Toggle Prime if needed to keep the engine running. Let it settle down just below 1000RPM and then do it 3 more times- see, SIMPLE.

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The details are for Douglas aficionados. If you are new to this aeroplane, please don’t fret- the Artificial Flight Engineer will hold your hand through managing this awesome mechanical wonder. Later, once you are ahead of the aeroplane you can choose to rely on him less and less.​

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​ It was a short taxi to Rwy 16, so we asked Wien Ground if we could do all our run ups just short of entering E and they were happy to oblige. So were all the rampies. Later we would hear that several Austrian, Edelweiss, Condor, Lufty and even one Speedbird flight were delayed due to a momentary disappearance of support personnel….

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After all the checks were complete, we trundled down to Bravo 1. As you saw from our Tablet we were far away from EIGHT SEVEN SIX (87,600lbs) the magic number for Wet Take Offs, so we were dry. Everts policy is to use 50” MAP unless necessary, and that’s what we would do- lot’s of asphalt ahead. So one last look from the top- pumps are not needed today, windshield warming is off for now, but we will turn it on in climb- this old Perspex isn’t like the new composite sandwiches, we like to use heat gently. Airfoil Heat is not needed, but probably will be in the descent. Pitot heat will go on just before power. Cowls are already trailing at 3 degrees which will help the warm up, even though it’s not hot this morning. Pressurization is set to 13,000 with the Start Marker at field altitude. Lights are on.

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Fuel pressures and oil and engine temperatures all look normal, Flaps are set to 20, trim is set to ELEV [image]​ It’s all VERY SCIENTIFIC… just wait until you see the Speed Tables…

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Our calculated TO weight is 70,200lbs so looking at our handy dandy Take Off Performance Calculator (I think this pre-dates my first 8086) we find that V1 is 83KIAS, V2/VR is 98. We will probably relay rotation until 100 just because it’s easier for me to find on the circular thingamajiggy.

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Here we are lined up

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I’m going to talk you through the take off, but I won’t do it any justice.

One last look around and a double check that the Gust Lock is off, Parking Brake ON. BTW in MSFS just as in real world aviation- controls FULL and FREE is very important. There are all sorts of issues that come from not exercising the controls through their full travel.

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Auto Feather On and then advance the throttles slowly to 30”MAP and wait and watch. The props are very large, heavy metallic discs that take time to accelerate. Once everything looks good at 30” and everyone on the flight deck is happy, move the throttles forward to 50” MAP. As you pass 40” you can release the Parking Brake and start the hack on the clock. Ensure you have 50” and the props are at 2800RPM so that you know you are producing rated power. Keep the aeroplane on the centerline and the wings level. Unlike swept wing jets, this straight wing flies early, and so aileron into the wind has never been more important. As she builds to speed, if you have very scientifically set the trim per the earlier procedure, she will levitate.

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Note I do not use the word rotate- rather- levitate. She rises like an Otis Elevator, very stately, and ponderous. The photo above illustrates one wing flying before the other. The photo below shows her clawing for the sky- just LOOK at that deck angle!

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What you absolutely CANNOT see, hear and feel is the magnificent accomplishment of PMDG. They have taken ones and zeros and amalgamated them into a living, breathing, belching, vibrating and resonating airframe that will haunt your waking thoughts and invade your dreams. The needles quiver, the panel shakes, the isolation mounts move, the engines and props drown out the world (and evoke arched eyebrows from the Trolly Dolly), the nose wheel directly below squeals and sashays in turns, the controls thrum and with just a modicum of willing suspension of belief you are soon lifted away from the Salt Mines, and aloft in an airborne chariot of the Gods from the 1950s. Armen is one of my favorite developers, as his is the medium of sound. In this aeroplane, and with this Simulator, he has the ability to let loose the Dogs of War, and he has done so brilliantly.

My iPhone text and ring tones are DC-6 and so is my wallpaper….

Here we are starting to clean up. The power is at 46/26 METO and we are turning to 239 inbound the Sollenau VOR…. Look where we are… just above the numbers at the end and much, much lower than a jet transport. Departure planning in this old girl is much more important to you reaching retirement age, than it ever was in those new-fangled jets (BTW they SUCK!)!

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You can see that as we are light today, with the power back to 40/24 we would have an obscene deck angle, so to keep the gang in the back from complaining about spilled coffee, and keep ATC somewhat happy with having to fit this old girl into their departure flow, we are letting the speed build.

Obviously, to do this, we had to retract the Lights, Flap was cleaned up, Cowls are at 6 degrees for the climb, Hydraulic Bypass has been selected off and we are happily climbing towards Sollenau at 1300FPM. Wien Radar has already cleared us to head to Linz as soon as we are able. As I have a current vehement aversion to putting a GPS in this old girl, I have to wait until I have a pointing needle, and they as usual are being very accommodating.

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Now, Linz is pointing and Wien Radar has cleared us direct, so a turn on to 280 should get us there nicely. Please note DME 2 in use. You will also note MAP is back to 39" and that is the band I use (as I set power manually). I have spent a lot of time with power charts, and have decided if I keep climb power between 39-41" I’m good. Almost everything points to a happy climb at 40/2400 and so as to not have me worked into a lather, and actually have time to navigate, I give myself this little leeway.

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Here we are in cruise at 2050/138 BMEP.

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The air is thinner, speed has built and temps and pressures are all good. We are running cool today, but a look at the OAT gauge tells us it’s reasonable. This is Henning’s seat- he’s the one constantly mumbling about how he allows me to fly HIS aeroplane and how pilots are really Prima-Donnas with big wristwatches, whilst HE the Flight Engineer, has forgotten more about this aeroplane than the tossers up front will ever know! He’s also the guy who smacks me on top of my head if he feels I’m abusing HIS engines… more on that later… as you can see the landing gear is in Netural, Hyd Bypass OFF and the engines are tightly cowled at -2 and the Mixtures are in Auto Lean. Happy Days…

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Now you can see that Salzburg is pointing, and once again Wien Radar, obliging as ever, has issued a Direct. Never one complaint, rather like ZATL Stateside, these two Vatsim regions rival LON CON for top notch controlling. I have never felt more at home than in these 3 areas.

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We are cruising happily, and there is no fuel management. That’s not to say that there are no fuel concerns. We constantly tick off where the fuel is supposed to be and compare it to where it actually is. The first sign of a leak would be unequal tanks, but today alles gut.

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At Salzburg, things will get busy! We have pre tuned the LOC DME EAST and have it ready to select as soon as we overfly. Then RTT is also tuned on the ADF. Our plan is to start the descent crossing Salzburg, so that it can be a gentle cruise descent of about 300 FPM. That will let us keep the BMEP up, and reduce MAP by 2” every 5 minutes or so, and still let us get to 9500 at RTT… at least that is the plan. With these complex pieces of heat producing metal, thermal management is the mark of a proficient pilot. With toasters in the back (usually) passenger comfort isn’t a priority, but engine comfort is, and they are usually synonymous. What a happy coincidence!

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​Here we are just past Salzburg, power is now back to 25” and we are keeping a good lock on speed. We are homing in on the RTT NDB and the engines are happy and not cooling too rapidly, and the view out of the window isn’t half bad… it will get better [image]​

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After crossing RTT at 9500 we will strike out on course 210 to intercept the LOC at ADWIG. Before ADWIG we will have made sure that INN’s altitude of 1907’ (2000) has been set on the FIELD needle, we will have pressurized hydraulics, unlocked and moved Mixtures to Auto Rich and turned on the Seat Belt sign. Then it’s a simple maths problem to maintain ROD (we’re thinking 1000FPM to get started) and cross all the steps at the correct platform heights. This is where we will be on our toes. It will be important to start the descent with gear dangling, and fly down the valley at Flap 20. That will give us our best chance to keep from driving the engines, rather letting the engines drive the props. Stepping down should be thermally comfortable as long as we remember she does everything, but does NOTHING fast.

A few minutes to Rattenberg and it’s getting bouncy. We are descending through 10k, the belts are going on and it’s time to put away the Coffee… there will be plenty of stimulus ahead.

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Ok, now’s when everything starts to happen at once.

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Ok, power is at 24/24 and we are crossing RTT at 9500’ headed out on a course of 210 to intercept the LOC DME East.

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We are flying the LOC- IGNORING the GS indications and using the GLIDE wheel to target -1000FPM. Then it’s a matter of adjusting the VS so that we cross the next gate precisely. This is not absolute, as long as the aircraft does not descend BELOW the altitude gate. The golden light is a bonus.

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At 10 DME we are 100’ above where we need to be at 5900’ which is comfortable.

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What is ABSOLUTE is 3700’ near RUM (I remember and miss the break at Absam). At 3700’ and 4.2 DME OVE we break out left on a course of 230 towards the INN NDB. This remember, is ALL VISUAL.

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Now we look for the power lines and follow them down to the Axam’s Church

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and if you have a spare hand (I don’t) remember to wave to the Eine Kleine Hausfrau hanging out the washing…

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At 3.5 DME OEV the rubber meets the road… we have to make a descending right course reversal to intercept the final approach course for Runway 08. It is a raw visual, completely visceral maneuver where you are now not flying but rather have become the aeroplane. It is a series of fluid movements where you are extended through the stout Douglas metalwork and are swooping through the valley to descend like a hawk towards it’s prey.

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It is not a steady roll rate, rather one that is constantly changing, along with pressure on the Elevator and Rudder, descending, slowing, pushing props full forward, dropping more Flap and all the while making sure that the engines are still driving those great big props, and the force is not the other way 'round.

Everything went smoothly, and as we rolled out on heading I heard a great big sigh. Apparently Henning had been holding his breath whilst I was wrestling with the controls.

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Suddenly, it all settled into place and everything looked like it usually does on final approach… as though anything about flying into Innsbruck was usual… we were on speed, on path, and I could hear Vin softly say, “Holy @%^p!”

Over the numbers we were in good shape and 3 squeaks later (well, maybe one was a THUNK) we were rolling down the centerline.

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Wien Radar was very happy that we made Bravo and he did not have to ask the Dash 8 behind us to Go Around- we got a “Gut gemacht” for that!

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All too soon we had pulled on to stand and were leaving for the evening. I managed to capture a Moon Rise… just for you.

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You would think that would be the end of the story, but no. In the Shuttle to the Lodge I checked my phone. I had 3 missed calls and 4 text messages from Robert asking me if his aeroplane was in one piece. I didn’t reply… it’s Henning’s aeroplane anyhow…

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Gute Nacht! Ich wünschte, du wärst hier!

C​

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​ The photo above reminded me about something that is truly and uniquely wonderful about the Six in this Sim. Because of that great big Douglas stout straight wing you will experience flying-the-wing in earnest… let me expound…

On the take off roll, the upwind wing will fly first. Aileron will be needed for wings level. Then when she starts to fly, a couple of magical things occur. First, because of her squat (look at the deck angle when she’s loaded to the gills) the nose wheel starts flying first- sounds CHANGE along with rudder needs to track centerline. Then as lift finally parts Goodyears from asphalt she weather vanes into the prevailing wind. There’s a connect that is quite enchanting as you figure out drift angle for course line, rather rapidly, especially with dual runway operations.

At the other end of your journey as lift dissipates and the rubber sinks to meet the road, those long gangly oleos have a lot of soak. She ceases flight at three very distinct contact points, and yet, whilst the body is done with flight- the wing ISN’T! This aeroplane, after the three tire chirps, still has a flying wing that will require attention all the way down to a slow taxi. While you’re flying the wing, just don’t forget to reach up for the cowls (full open) and down for the gust lock as that last bit of aileron comes out when you’re finally slow enough.

The entire experience is somewhat akin to sailing. In fact, if you’ve ever docked a float plane, using propwash, flight controls and the occasional popped open door to nuzzle up to the dock gently, you’ll be fully attuned to the nuances of moving Douglas spars (and their accompanying sundries) across continents.

She’s different enough to part the curtain and give you a peek at what was…. Now, if I could just convince the Trolly Dolly to let me put an open can of AeroShell nearby, things would be almost perfect!

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​ The end of this story has us back at Anchorage so that 0CE can go back to flying the sked… to Nome, Bethel, Fairbanks, Barrow and Yakutat… all very familiar and comfortable (if one can say that about Alaska flying). I turned around for one last look before heading home for a few days off… wanna see?

She’s oh so familiar, and lovely in soft light… thanks Pete! Mac Paint

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If this sort of thing is for you… add a comment here. I will try and update as possible. She’s very complicated, and YET VERY SIMPLE! Don’t fret about spending hours reading the manuals. THE AFE WILL HOLD YOUR HAND THROUGH THE PROCESS. Later as you develop your aircraft management skill set, you can have him do less and less, until like me, you stop using him altogether, and end your sessions with the Six in a happy, self actualized FROTH!

:slight_smile:

C

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They don’t look like images taken from a video game (simulator),
but photos taken in the real world … :sob: :sob: :sob:
great plane and great flight, congratulations :+1: :wink:

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WOW, great work.

Haha, great post. Seriously nice screenshots.

I’m tempted, although it does seem a bit too much airplane for me to handle. But just the idea to finally have a realistic simulation of an airliner, after waiting almost a year…

What surprises me though - sort of unrelated - that there’s still no announcement on the PMDG website? Just nothing? Not even a ‘coming soon’… so how soon is it coming?

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Hi there,
Thank you for your detailed posts!
Please don’t forget to post PMDG-related things in Third Party Addon Discussion > Aircraft instead of General Discussion. I have moved this topic.

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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: Let yourself be tempted… this is an AIRPLANE…
the 787, everyone is capable of flying it :wink:

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I was swayed a bit by the part about the airplane shaking and vibrating. PMDG did that also right - or at least spectacular - in their Boeings in FSX. Just rolling for takeoff and being thrown around, combined with the sounds… or hitting turbulence in the 747 and see the interior move independently…

Once you experience that, the current airplanes are all rather boring.

So yes, I might… :slight_smile:

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Don’t worry about the complexities… she’s hugely complex AND YET eminently manageable due to the beautifully programmed AFE.

The shaking, sounds, vibration and visuals ARE SUPERLATIVE… this will move the goalposts forever.

C

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Spread the word, Carl :smiley:

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The forum is actually full of DC-6, RSR even made 18 tutorial videos stand today and there he announces a June release. (yes, 2021). Don’t go by the website, it can change in a second. ^^

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She’s always been one of my very favorites… and this sim WAS MADE for her! Cruising at 7000 or in the teens, you can SEE our wonderful world go by.

The sensory stimuli is sensational:)

C

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Yep, I know about the June promise. That’s why I have been checking the website…

To me that’s where they sell their stuff, where they promote their stuff. And seeing that we’re in the month of June now, one would expect some mention? Maybe it’s me, but seeing it not on there makes me think June could just as easily turn into July…

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Here’s another trip report for those who don’t visit www.pmdg.com regularly… I know we are witnessing the birth of an entirely new crowd of Flight Simmers, and I hope that some of them will become curious about what a superbly done Commercial Douglas Transport from the 50s can bring to their excursions…

Jackson Hole in the PMDG DC-6- whilst TRYING to staying WARM!

​ Almost everything about piston transport flying in the 50’s was different from that of current jet transport operations. For optimal efficiency, jets climb fast, get up high and stay high until the very last moment, then descend at idle for a shallow glide to touchdown. Large radial transports climb slowly (managing heat), choose the best possible, lowest altitude for ground speed and terrain clearance, and start down early (managing heat) for a dive and drive approach to touchdown. The dynamics and thermodynamics are completely different.

Nothing brings the problem into stark relief like an unusual approach. Thermal management in a radial transport isn’t just a matter of safety or comfort. It directly and significantly effects the operators bottom line. Sending a couple of R2800s to Anderson Aeromotive is likely to be noticed by your Board of Directors, everyone with a lower Seniority Number than you and every Accountant involved in the fiscal stream. It is also likely to get you a tea and biscuits session with the Chief Pilot (who, by the way, is notorious for tepid tea and soggy biscuits). Not something you want recorded in your logbook!

The VOR DME Rwy 1 into Jackson Hole was something to brief for.

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Enroute, whilst ogling the passing landscape there was opportunity to discuss the upcoming arrival. Please note, terrain is significant enough to disallow this approach without a LOCAL altimeter setting… foretelling at it’s most nuanced.

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First this was not the usual airliner approach into JAC. Most of the time the more standard ILS Z Rwy 19 was flown. Today was different. There are pilots, much more experienced than I, who descend this aircraft at 1000FPM and let her run well into the 230-240 range. This is efficient, and an economically sound way to descend. I however, descend her at 500FPM, and slowly reduce MAP from cruise at no more than 2" every 5 or so minutes. This simulates operation of a radial on my budget. The Trolly Dolly, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and She Who Must Be Obeyed takes a dim view of writing checks with lots of zeros. I try and accommodate her whims.

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Ok- so we had settled on a cruise altitude of 17,000 for the Santa Barbara-Jackson Hole run in the 6A. Looking at terrain clearance, and thermal performance requirements, I decided to cruise descend to 13,000 passing Malad City VOR. That left us above MSA and as low as we could go. Weather not being an obstacle, and no real huge headwind to contend with, there was no point in being higher than needed. Energy was not going to be our friend shortly.

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Departing Malad on the 024 radial outbound (repetitive, as radials are ALWAYS outbound from the station) we had tuned in JAC on VOR 2.

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Getting a pointer and DME was going to be very important. All the while I was watching temps, and reducing MAP so that I could stay green, and keep a low energy state. Now, here’s where a Sectional (remember those?) becomes very handy!

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Looking at the terrain, I verified, that whilst the MSA in the Low Altitude Enroute grid squares on our path were 12,300 at 13,000 the actual terrain along our route would permit the published approach crossing altitude of 10,500 at ODREE (OBVIOUSLY) BUT ALSO, that other than one 10,103 peak just to the right of the Lone Pine and Freedom Air private strips, there was nothing else to particularly threaten our descent profile. Just as soon as JAC was pointing we positioned ourselves for the FAC of 008.

ODREE was 8 miles from ZIPET, where we intercepted a 3.33 degree glideslope, steeper than normal. That meant I wasn’t going to be able to dump any excess energy on the way down. It also meant, that if I was going to keep all the metal bits that touch each other, nicely lubricated, I was not going to be able to cut power to keep on profile. Therefore, the name of the game was cross ODREE at exactly 10,500 while slow enough to drop gear. Now, HERE’s where all you Jet Jocks are shaking your collective heads about the inefficiencies of dragging gear 16 miles out of the TDZ, while a couple of Grey Hairs, are nodding their heads at the wisdom of poking draggy bits into the slipstream.

Props went forward to 2400 (I don’t push them all the way forward until cutting power for the flare) and Flaps came out as early as possible. This allowed for a positive BMEP all the way down.

Careful, small reductions of MAP along the way and we were positioned nicely on short final.

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With no one behind me, a tug on the Reversing Bar (with the lovely accompanying THUNK) had the props pushing instead of pulling, and not being tempted by the turnoff, she ran all the way to the end as I let her idle with the long stretch of Asphalt ahead, only requiring a tiny squeak of brake just before turning off.

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Heat (and inversely, cooling) are going to become an important facet of flight management. Fortunately, PMDG has a nice surprise in store for you, that will allow for you to accomplish thermal management in a tangible and interactive way. In so many ways, this aeroplane is most endearing. Some of you have been asking about computer speakers. Do yourself a favor, and get the best you can in preparation for this beauty. I have a Bose system with a Sub, and this aeroplane may well exercise it better than anything I have flown yet!

You will soon discover her charms for yourself- I for one can’t wait until the skies are filled with Douglas Transports, all wreaking havoc on high density arrival flows at major hubs- that will be a great day!

TTFN​

If you already know my yarns, apologies. I am hoping that the non traditional Flight Simmer can also discover the enchantment of a beautifully made aircraft add-on in this fantastic iteration of MS Flight Simulator.

Trust me when I say… MSFS will never be the same. There will always be- before PMDG and after PMDG- period.

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… if her complexities scare you… take time to watch https://youtu.be/NsjdJdhMuzg

It will do two things…

  1. Re-assure you about your abilities to handle this wonderful creature &
  2. Help you learn about 1950s airliner operation

Can you tell I love her?

C

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I never bought any PMDG stuff for the older sims but after watching all the tutorial vids and reading stuff like this for the DC-6 I’m seriously considering it for MSFS

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