Help with landing on short airstrips

True indeed. I tend to use it when I am carrying a little more speed and/or altitude than planned…

Side slipping doesn’t help at all, because you can’t land in this condition!

More weight on the wheels doesn’t seem to work in the sim due to flap retraction if @DrumminFliers observation about aerodynamic braking is correct. Only IRL.

No worries, I got it from what you guys were talking about with each other. I’ll keep it in mind.

Just saying I didn’t even know it was a thing.

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Just coming back here to say that I did bring down the speed to somewhere in between 40 and 50kts on the next airstrip and the landing went great. Then I went on to finish the Bush Trip without problems.

Indeed, it was just a matter of pitching slightly up while descending to bring down the speed, while gradually extending the flaps, without fear of stalling. The plane came down gently and came to a full stop pretty quickly. I had airstrip to spare where before it seemed to only last a fraction of a second.

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Thats not aerodynamic braking, thats just transferring weight onto the main landing gear (on a tricycle gear on a taildragger you’ll need to push). Aerodynamic braking is what fighter jets commonly do, keeping the nose into the air to increase aerodynamic drag, this is ineffective compared to increasing braking effectiveness on a small GA aircraft.

I find the plane X Cub in the bush trip handles differently than when flying it ‘outside’ a bush trip. I never have issues with landing it when I fly whereever I want on the world map. But in the Patagonia bush trip I very often crash on landing…

That’s weird. Confirm the cabin and fuel load are identical?

From an aerodynamical perspective a side slip is used to be able to fly a steeper approach without gaining speed. you tap into the full right rudder and cross the aileron (give left aileron) to maintain your direction of flight towards the runway. Doing that you turn your fuselage into the wind which is a big airbrake. IRL you have to pull back significantly because the elevator loses effectiveness if the air flows against it from the side. I found that’s not necessary in the sim, probably due to the overeffective controls we have.

Slowly go back to normal by centering the rudder or you might experience a stall on the back swinging wing if you do it too agressively.

Some aircraft have a long nose (take the Spitfire of Corsair for examples) that prevents the view to the runway and therefore they often use a side slip technique to keep the runway in view. We had a Christen Eagle at the aerodrome which always came in on a flat glide path with the nose to the right. He had an approach speed of 80 something knots and watching him land on 670m was always a guarantee for turned heads ^^

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@Ephedrin87

Yeah, it makes sense.

This could come in handy at times, cause when flying into unfamiliar airports I find that I often misjudge the distance and I end up too high for a landing… but then I don’t want to bother turning around and repositioning myself, so I end up making bad choices and coming down too fast.

And the view angle issue in real life is something I have wondered many times while using these kind of planes in the game. Not just for flying maneuvers but even for taxiing. On the ground, in cockpit view, I have no idea where I’m going with planes like the X Cub. The nose completely blocks the view forward.

That’s because the default view point is way too low on most MSFS aircraft.

If you don’t modify the view point manually, you can use the landing view to increase the seat height.

Huh, is it? Interesting. I figured since the game has a warning message about the angle it was just a feature of those planes.

I do change to outside view often because it’s great to take in the scenery, and definitely for taxiing, but I find that for landings it’s easier for me to stick to the cockpit view as distances are better represented. The default outside camera lens is too wide so the whole plane can be on screen and that makes things seem further away than they really are.

What warning message?
edit: that’s what it looks like IRL…
CubCrafter’s Carbon Cub SS with GoPro - YouTube

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There’s an in-game message that pops up when using planes like the X Cub or Savage Cub about a “restricted viewing angle” from the inside because the nose blocks the view forward.

EDIT: Yeah, that’s absolutely not how it looks in the game. You have no idea where you’re going.

Weird. I’ve never seen this message and it doesn’t make sense.

You can manually increase the seat height in the camera or view menu if you don’t want to change the camera.cfg.
Default height is 50%.

keep in mind that he has probably the cam mounted on top of his headset so this gives us additional 10cm in the video. Kermit Weeks mentions that a couple of times in his Kermie Cam videos, for example in the P40 or P51.

Which doesn’t make a significant difference :wink: and a lot depends on the pilots size.
That’s almost exactly what I’m seeing from a Super Cub cockpit.

I find it a big difference. Go to any camera.cfg and change the 3rd value behind eyepoint= by 0.3 (feet). It looks entirely different.
I haven’t flown many taildraggers in RW, only E-Falke and a Super Dimona but they are hardly comparable with the flat angle on the ground.

Are you sure the values are still feet as in FSX and not meters?
Anyway, IRL you can usually see over the nose in e.g. a Super Cub.

That‘s what‘s written behind them in some addons. I hope that‘s true. 30cm would be a bit much :smiley:

Its a little comprehensive maybe but maybe it contains some useful info:

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