Thinking of subscribing to Foreflight

I assume your a real world pilot as well,

@JWATTS0275 - As @LesOReilly4451 mentions, don’t check this box in FltPlan. Start there and you should be fine playing with the functionality. Will teach weight and balance and flight planning. You can always upgrade later if you really want to.

I use Navigraph ultimate, Combined with Simbrief it’s perfect for my needs.

Is there a site with a tabulated feature comparison of all the EFBs?

I’ve been using Garmin Pilot with PilotEdge mainly because I’m working on getting current again, but it also makes Flight Simulator amazingly immersive. Just wondering if I’m missing out not using ForeFlight or an ipad.

For the OP, Garmin Pilot has a thirty day trial, and I believe Pilot Edge does as well. Talking to real controllers, using real tools, and then just letting the sim move your plane and draw the graphics is a pretty incredible experience. Definitely worth at least trying.

Not that I’m aware of. Foreflight is what 99% of real world pilots use and also has a 30 day trial. I personally bought an iPad just for the trial and purchased it.

If you’re flying in the US, you can’t beat FltPlan Go if you have an old Kindle or Tab A laying around… I had 4… But having used it for 3-4 years just wanted to step up.

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@JWATTS0275 - saw this thread and thought you might be interested…

https://forums.flightsimulator.com/t/msfs-ground-school-lessons-from-a-real-pilot-and-former-flying-school-instructor/442321

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Thats brilliant thanks very much.

VFR is much more than planning straight lines from source to destination.

It’s an art and science of using landmarks, dead reconning, wind etc.

IFR navigation is actually much easier

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Yes, VFR is purely straight line :rofl: :rofl:
Try and fly straight line here anywhere (this is Luxembourg and a part of Belgium, arguably Belgium are the champions of prohibited and restricted areas, but most of Europe is more or less like this)

Sorry but when we learn to fly planes and do our “Flight Plan” yeah we draw our tracklines and our deviation lines… We mark checkpoints for fuel and time comparisons…

However you are not plotting airways and radials… Yes you use your tack lines to make sure that you account for Wind correction angles… But sorry… we drew straight lines… You would have a set heading point that you fly to and then “set your heading from that point”…

And yes you look out the window and go…

That is not what our conversation was about… but okay champ …

please show me how you learned to fly VFR for your pilots license… That is how we learn here where sure we have Restricted air space… but most of the time that is why you pick a set heading point that keeps you out of it… And sure you might have another point that you will set heading again… to maximize straight lines… Otherwise you will have trouble calculating winds aloft and thus your durations and fuel burn.

Basically look up real PPL flight planning methods and get back to me…

I think what folks were pointing out is that there are lots of ways to plan and conduct a VFR flight, and as it relates to this conversation, having a real EFB like ForeFlight can be a massive help and also make the simulator much more usable and immersive.

I’ve been using Garmin Pilot to fly VFR Flyways and not bust the Bravo airspaces at St. Louis, LA, and San Diego, and indeed it’s been a huge help and greatly extended the capabilities of Flight Simulator.

Lots of not straight lines on the flyway, coast, river, or road you’re following. The EFB helps enormously with situational awareness. Can you accomplish the same stuff with free tools? Sure. Are they as full featured, easy to use, and “real”? Probably not. Does that justify a subscription cost? That’s up to the user I think. For me it definitely is.

FLTPlan GO is a fully featured tool and is free… But is only for north America…

It will provide all of that data… Will Garmin Kill it off one day… Probably since once they have all of the integration with the Fltplan platform complete… But sure seems like a lot of money spent to buy that company if not for the fact that FLTPLAN has been the leader in planning and filing if flight plans in the US for a long time…

I’m just trying out FltPlan Go now, and ForeFlight is next on the list before I settle on something that I’ll be using long term. So far I find it a bit more cumbersome and “amateurish”(?), but it could be I’m just not used to it yet, so I’ll give it several more flights. There are things I didn’t like about Garmin Pilot either, so I’m eager to try ForeFlight. I need to actually buy an iPad first though.

with an ASPEN Pro PFD and Garmin GNS-480 the functionality of FTLPlan GO did not have have anything “missing” from the needs… I can file in the App both VFR or IFR. Synthetic Vision? On the PFD… But it connects Bluetooth to the GTX-345 and I get all the ADS-B in features and traffic…

UI is definitely something they were going to start working on but were acquired by Garmin … very little has been done for the application except for those customers that leverage their other Platform integration… It will be gone one day… Garmin is not going to continue to give it away for free.

Flight plan times – altitude winds and all info has been bang on… Hard to tell someone here who want this for a simulator to pay that kind of money for foreflight… Might as well just put that money into Navigraph and use Fltplan Go…

Yes. Garmin bought FltPlan Go a couple years ago. It’s had some quality improvements over time.

The business model is based on ad revenue and data. I they they believe pilots NEED efb’s today and they’re providing a free starter. As the individual’s needs evolve, that pilot will upgrade to user friendly payware, preferably their own Garmin pilot.

Another product to consider is Android based Avare. I use it for my real flying, and therefore it’s helpful to use it with MSFS as well.

I wrote a post on how to connect it to MSFS

The only thing I miss out on from Foreflight is the ground altitude along the flight map. But, like the others, it has free access to the actual taxiways and runways and charts, etc., whereas MSFS for whatever reason, chose not to implement real life taxi-maps. I have no idea what they were thinking given the info is freely available. So, in this regard, Little Nav Map shines as it gets its data from the sim.

Cool, I know I am not real life pilot, but love the tools available, I get as much joy planning my route as much as flying. Weather data and love IFR maps, love navigating VOR as well, but it seems the future may decommission all of them…and I admire any advice from real world pilots. UK seems to be of VFR free maps…but available for US.

I’m pretty sure Avare is used in Europe, too. There’s a user forum where you can find out what the European users do for charts.

Focus on the topic, not on each other. Non-compliant posts were removed. Get it back on track folks or the thread gets actioned.